Close encounters with Australian natives of the cute kind

Now I’ve give you all a fright with the lovely large hairy spiders in Tasmania, Australia, perhaps it’s time to tell you some farm stories about our seriously cute native Australian animals.  Particularly I’d like to tell you about some of the cute and quirky animals that are here right on our farm.

We have platypus, but they are shy and we don’t see them very often.

11896128_10153235088213020_790029876817827066_n

This platypus was enjoying the flooded paddocks just a few months ago.

11873793_10153235088573020_4172898189799351407_n

Then we have echidnas.  Spiny little creatures that are so cute.  This one decided to come into our dairy one afternoon during milking. Very unusual.  They are shy too.

1524002_10152019460583020_1337833161_o

1236825_10152019460398020_1326383178_n

On Thursday Paul sent me a this photo of a wallaby who was up way past his bed time.  They are nocturnal but he was burning the mid-day-oil in our front garden. No doubt he was helping out with the pruning of my parsley – again!

10472091_10153342162278020_8259809926609103782_n

There are lots of birds.  Black swans, Willy wag tails, Eagles, Hawks, Finches, Purple Swamp Hens, Native Hens, Mountain Ducks… too many to tell you about.  Here is a Blue Wren and a Jenny Wren taken a few years ago on our wood box outside the front door.

77657_10151087938218020_272137439_o

And most years there are Welcome Swallow babies in their permanent nest also right outside the front door.  This nest is a fixture on the farm house.  When the house was painted several years ago the painter had firm instructions to carefully paint around it.

965837_10151932315953020_623547273_o

A celebrity one-eyed Kookaburra came to visit in 2010.  He seemed very tame, wanting to be where people were.  I phoned the local wildlife park in Mole Creek (about 20 minutes drive from here) and asked if they were missing a one-eyed Kookaburra and they were.  There’d been a big storm several days previously and his enclosure had been damaged.  They came right over and had no trouble getting him to come to them.  I was sad to see him go but happy to know he was safe.  Paul had been feeding him mince but I was still concerned he was hungry.

47067_437581338019_6079205_n

33580_437581318019_3527241_n

Then there are our two cats Poppy and Mintie.

10983546_10152805897408020_142744568550547247_o

The cats have a tough life as you can see.

Keeping an eye on the farmer from up stairs.

Keeping an eye on the farmer from up stairs.

And there are cows – 100s of them.  Here are two of the stars of the herd.

This is Ruggy. She is number 100 and my favourite cow. Named because her coat would make a wonderful rug.

This is Ruggy. She is number 100 and my favourite cow. Named because her coat would make a wonderful rug.

This is 21. She is the most social cow in the herd and gets upset if I drive by and don't stop to say hello and give her a scratch on the head.

This is 21. She is the most social cow in the herd and gets upset if I drive by and don’t stop to say hello and give her a scratch on the head.

And at this time of years there are babies everywhere.

And at this time of years there are babies everywhere.

But if you are lucky you will see the rare Wild Man from Montana, an introduced species from New Zealand who has adapted to life in Tasmania as if he was a native.  Sometimes if you are really lucky you will see him dressed up for dinner leaping over water tanks.  Other times he’ll be in his farm gear and gum boots or dressed up for running.  The rarest of all farm creatures, in fact there is only one in all the world.

10952298_10152811733898020_9170479735141527710_o

11903873_10153235088093020_7728329557966434336_n

Lots of seriously cute and perhaps some quirky animals out here on the farm.  I hope this dose of cuteness has taken away the chills that my last post might have caused.

Happy running 🙂

8 thoughts on “Close encounters with Australian natives of the cute kind

  1. Oh neat, I just happened upon your blog (thanks to Sue Slaught) and isn’t it wonderful! I’m enjoying your photos and your fun text that goes with them. What a beautiful farm with quirky delicious creatures. On another note, I’m attending the “Tufts 10K” run in Boson on Monday. I’m an unsporty woman who can run (but most days, prefers long walks and hikes). 🙂

  2. Have you named all the cows, or just your favourites? I’m not sure Ruggy would be very fond of you if she knew you coveted her hide as a rug 😉

    Thanks for the introduction to the cuties on your farm. I’ve never heard of a echidnas before but he is cute in a wild, freakishly-large-claws kind of way. Those are big claws for a little guy.

    • A lot of cows have names but not all. Even if they only have numbers it kind of feels like a name because they all have their own personalities. Ruggy is a placid cow and a huge producer – she’s so laid back and knows I love her so I’m sure my rug thing would be a compliment to her hehe. Echidnas are so cute. The dig a lot hence the big feet. They’re more for digging than scratching. And easy to pick up as you can see by the photo. They quills only go one way so as long as you pat them the way they quills are going there are no scratches.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s